Fiction II/III with the Sackett Street Writers Workshop
Jun
8
to Jul 27

Fiction II/III with the Sackett Street Writers Workshop

Writers participating in this course will learn to recognize successful techniques in their fiction–what engages the reader, and how that success is achieved. In-class discussions will focus on analyzing student work, particularly the many choices (point-of-view, tone, detail, pacing, etc.) a writer must make concerning structure, character and language. Each writer will have two opportunities to have his or her work critiqued in class (up to 25 pages each time) and will receive typed feedback from both the instructor and his or her classmates. A private conference with the instructor is included. This course is intended for writers who have writing and workshopping experience.

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Kill Genre Presents: Wet Hot American Summer
May
31
8:00pm 8:00pm

Kill Genre Presents: Wet Hot American Summer

Kill Genre is a quarterly reading series based in New York, NY. The first series of its kind, it showcases groundbreaking works that push the boundaries of form and flirt dangerously with hybridity, integrates musical performance, and includes the audience in innovative ways. Come see the best and most original writers in New York brandish their skills in other genres—from fiction to essays to memoir to more experimental forms—because, when it comes to genre, it’s kill or be killed. FEATURING: Amanda Calderon, Rachel Lyon, Michael Tyrell, and the music of Pete Mancini

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Class: School of Making Thinking
Feb
15
to Apr 5

Class: School of Making Thinking

George Saunders has said, “Bad dialogue is when A asks a question and B answers it.” Dialogue should be two people “firing missiles past each other.” And well-written dialogue is “like poetry—it’s not functional, but it looks good on the page and has a zinginess." Even our greatest writers have a complicated relationship with dialogue. For years Zadie Smith didn't write dialogue at all, because Nabokov was against it.

In this course, we analyzed the power dynamics, performance, communication, confession, (dis)functionality, and "zinginess" of organic and constructed dialogue from vastly different sources—from Beckett to Gchat to the subway. We'll eavesdrop on ourselves, our friends, and strangers, and read between the lines in our own conversations. We'll comb through the archives at StoryCorps, and take a trip to see some improv comedy. And we'll practice the craft of writing great dialogue, from "said-bookisms" to dialogue tags, direct address, and beyond.

Check out a course archive for The School of Making thinking here.

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